Left Bracket
Testimonial
Testimonial
Testimonial
Testimonial
Testimonial
Right Bracket

“John Marshall’s externship program offers quality field placements that develop professional and practical skills while ensuring  successful and meaningful on-the-job performance.” Paul Nam, Graduate (’12)

Master Course List

2014-2015 Academic Year*

First Year Required Courses

105, 106          Civil Procedure I, II (3, 3)

Examination of questions of procedure including:  jurisdiction and venue; federal subject matter jurisdiction such as diversity and federal question jurisdiction; notice and code pleading; Federal Rules of Civil Procedure governing joinder of claims and parties; discovery; summary and default judgments; the right to a jury trial in civil matters; and issues of finality of judgments. Appropriate examples are drawn from Georgia law.

110, 111          Contracts I, II (3, 3)

Examination of the law of contracts including contract formation at common law and under the Uniform Commercial Code; consideration and other bases for enforcing promises; when a written instrument is required; parol evidence and interpretation; unconscionability and other defenses; rights of third parties; excuses for nonperformance; conditions, performance, and breach; and damages.

115, 116          Real Property I, II (3, 3)

Consideration of a variety of property-related topics, including some or all of the following: historical background; possessory,  and  non-possessory  interests  in  land  and  personal  property;  creation  and  transfer  of  property interests; concurrent estates; landlord and tenant law; public regulation of property; and eminent domain.

120, 121          Torts I, II (3, 3)

Examination of civil liability for interference with a broad array of legally protected interests, focusing on such topics as intentional wrongdoing, negligence, strict liability, causation, damages, wrongful death, and the law governing joint wrongdoers. Alternatives to the existing tort system may be discussed.

130      Professional and Academic Success Seminar (0)

The Professional and Academic Success Seminar (P.A.S.S.) is a required course for all incoming first-year students. The course trains students in the academic skills needed to maximize their academic performance. Students will practice and develop competencies in critical reading, case briefing, logic and legal analysis, note-taking, creating course outlines, and strategies and tactics for approaching multiple-choice and essay exams. The course also emphasizes developing effective study habits, time management and professionalism. Peer review, group work and faculty feedback provides students the opportunity to self-assess. Limited outside reading assigned, written assignments are all in-class.  (Pass/No Credit/Fail)

160      Criminal Law (3)

Examination of criminalization, definition, classification, Actus Reus, attempt, conspiracy, agency, parties to crime, causation, felony murder, Mens Rea, limitations on criminal capacity, homicide, assault and battery, burglary, theft crimes, and defenses.

205, 206          Legal Research, Writing & Analysis I, II (3, 3)

LRWA I trains students in the structure of the U.S. legal system, hierarchy of legal authority, legal analysis, legal research, and legal citation.  Students also receive training in critical reading, critical thinking, classical logic, the structure of legal writing, and objective legal writing.  LRWA I culminates in the drafting of an office memorandum. LRWA II continues to build on the skills learned in LRWA I with assignments requiring more sophisticated legal analysis.  Focus is on persuasive legal writing and training in computer assisted legal research. LRWA II culminates in the drafting of an appellate brief and an oral argument.

Upper Division Required Courses

140      Advanced Analytical Methods (2)

In depth approach to logical analysis targets developing skills in formal logic, critical reading, fact analysis, identifying legal issues, identifying analogues, and creating counter analysis, through a series of writing exercises. Students will employ these academic skills to accomplish directed writing objectives and to solve practical legal problems, including formulating and evaluating solutions to issues using relevant facts and law. Students will develop the ability to write clearly and concisely for the appropriate audience and to plan and organize written tasks under time constraints.   Required for students in the bottom 50% of the class, (determined for full-time students at the end of the 1L year, determined for part-time students after the Fall semester in the 2L year.)

150      Business Organizations (3)

Examination of the law relating to various forms of business organizations including agency, partnership, and corporations. Specifically, this course addresses the formation and property interests associated with these legal entities, including the rights, duties, and liabilities of the participants.

155, 156          Constitutional Law I, II (3, 3)

Examination of constitutional development including judicial review; the relationship in our federal system between the federal government and the states; the relationship of the states to each other; the powers of the judiciary; the powers of Congress; the powers of the President; the residual powers of the states; protection of the rights of individuals; procedural due process; substantive due process, including the development of rights under the 14th Amendment and under the “Bill of Rights”; equal protections of the laws; privileges and immunities of citizens; and the First Amendment.

165      Criminal Procedure (3)

Examination of the constitutional issues raised by pretrial law enforcement investigatory practices under the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The principle topics covered are search and seizure, confessions, self incriminations, identification procedures, the exclusionary rule, the right to counsel, and may include post-conviction processes.

170      Evidence (4)

Examination of the law of evidence including relevancy, impeachment, burden of proof, competency, privilege, demonstrative evidence, and writings. Federal Rules of Evidence are emphasized.

171      Evidence (2)

Examination of the law of evidence including relevancy, impeachment, burden of proof, competency, privilege, demonstrative evidence, and writings. Federal Rules of Evidence are emphasized.

172      Evidence (2)

Examination of the law of evidence including relvancy, impeachment, burden of proof, competency, privilege, demonstrative evidence, and writings. Federal Rules of Evidence are emphasized.

175      Professional Responsibility (2)

Examination of the attorney’s relationships with society, clients, the courts, and colleagues through a focus on the Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the Georgia variations thereof.

180      Remedies (3)

Examination of the theory and application of equitable remedies; the principles of equitable jurisdiction; the substantive law elements of restitution and damages.

185      Sales & Secured Transactions (3)

Examination of Articles 2 and 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code relating to sales, bulk sales, and secured transactions; creditor rights, creation and perfection of security interests; and priorities.

Upper Division Writing Requirements

201      Jurisprudence & Writing (3)

Introduction to the philosophy of law and the legal process. Designed to give students theoretical understanding of the origin and development of Jurisprudence in general; beginning with Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and the Bible; and including the works of various political and legal theorists covering the Classical Age, the Middle Age, the Modern Age, and the Twentieth Century. The course addresses selected philosophies, such as natural theory, legal positivism, legal realism, formalism, and utilitarianism, amongst others.  Satisfies upper level writing requirement. Limited to 22 students.

210      Pretrial Practice & Procedure (2)

A study of the pretrial process in civil litigation.  Students will represent a client beginning with an intake interview through cross-motions for summary judgment.  Students will draft pleadings, discovery requests, and pretrial motions.  Students will engage in simulated exercises including interviewing and counseling a client, arguing motions, negotiating settlements, and taking or defending depositions. Prerequisite: LWRA I & II. Satisfies upper level writing requirement. Limited to 24 students.

215      Transactional Drafting (3)

Students are trained to identify client goals, to translate those business goals into contract concepts, and draft contractual provisions which meet the client’s goals and limit the client’s risks. Prerequisite: LWRA I & II. Satisfies upper level writing requirement. Limited to 24 students.

217      Advanced Transactional Drafting (3)

This course continues to build on the skill learned in Transactional Drafting and Business Organizations with assignments requiring more sophisticated drafting and a deeper understanding of the typical documents associated with transactional law, such as asset purchase agreements, letters of intent, opinions of counsel, and confidentiality agreements. Using a variety of transactional law scenarios, students will develop skills in multi-party negotiations and deal management. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement. Limited to 24 students.

220      Trial Advocacy & Writing (3)

An intensive study of the preparation required for trial, and the essential techniques and skills required for trial practice.    In  addition  to  the  “on-your-feet”  skills  development  involved  with  opening  statements,  direct examination, cross examinations, and closing arguments, students will also be required to write trial-related documents including motions in limine and trial briefs.  As a result of the significant writing component, this class satisfies an upper division writing requirement.  This class involves the presentation of evidence or writing motions involving evidence. Prerequisite: LWRA I & II, Evidence. Limited to 12 students.

221      Arbitration & Writing (3)

A problem-oriented approach to the substantive common law and statute-based law of arbitration.  Coverage includes agreements to arbitrate and their enforceability under state and federal law; defenses to arbitration (including arbitrability, duress and unconscionability, consumer protection law, public interest, and successorship situations);  and  process  issues,  including  remedies  and  judicial  review.   Emphasis  is  on  arbitration  in  the commercial, labor and employment law contexts.  International arbitration may be included.  The course may include a substantial drafting component. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement.

225      Alternative Dispute Resolution & Writing (3)

This course focuses on the various approaches to, strategies and tactics involved in, and the development of essential skills required for effective mediations, arbitrations, and negotiations (both as an advocate and a neutral). This  class  is  experiential  in  nature  and,  thus,  students  participate  heavily  in  simulations  and  role  plays. Additionally, this course includes a significant writing component that satisfies an upper level writing requirement. Students who successfully complete all requirements of this class will earn a Mediator Certificate. Prerequisite: LWRA I & II. Limited to 20 students.

230      Advanced Legal Writing (2)

Building on practical skills learned in the first two years of law school, students will improve their ability to write sharp, clear prose, to edit their own and others’ writing, and become more proficient and efficient at composing and organizing written documents. Prerequisite: LWRA I & II. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement. Limited to 22 students.

235      Advanced Appellate Advocacy (2)

In depth study of appellate litigation practice.  Students will employ the advanced skills in research, writing and analysis  necessary  to  solve  complex  legal  problems  in  an  appellate  context.   Students  will  draft  appellate memoranda on complex legal issues  and  will  participate  in oral argument simulations.  Advanced Appellate Advocacy is a prerequisite to membership on the Law School’s moot court competition teams. Prerequisite: LWRA I & II. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement. Limited to 24 students.

240      Seminar — Civil Liberties: Litigation (Fall Semester, 2)

This seminar will allow students to work on a live legal issue and gain clinic-like experience working with a civil liberties issue.  The faculty member teaching this course will work with the Legal Director of the ACLU of Georgia to identify a case appropriate for students to work on. Students will engage in factual investigation and legal research for litigation.  Students may work on identifying appropriate potential clients, developing case strategy, provide written analysis of legal issues, and may assist co-operating attorneys in various phases of litigation process.  A written work product will be required and will form the basis of the student’s grade.  Students will work in teams of 2 or 3.  In addition to the two-hour-a-week classroom component, students will be required to engage in factual investigation, client meetings, and research outside of class time.  Personal transportation may be required.  The seminar will also contain a classroom component which will include guest speakers from the ACLU.  The course will be restricted to 16 students. Upper level standing is required. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement.

241      Seminar — Civil Liberties: Legislation (Spring Semester, 2)

This seminar will allow students to work on a live legal issue and gain clinic-like experience working with a civil liberties issue which is being addressed by the Georgia General Assembly.   The faculty member teaching this course will work with the Legal Director of the ACLU of Georgia to identify legal issues appropriate for students to work on.  Students will follow bills which have been introduced into the House and Senate, will attend committee hearings and floor debates, and may meet with legislators.  Students will be required to engage in lobbying, factual investigation, assist ACLU’s legislative counsel with legal research, drafting of legislation, and other lobbying activities.  A research paper critiquing proposed legislation and current law is required and will form the basis of the student’s grade.   Students will also draft a fact sheet for the public and legislators, committee hearing testimony, a legislative report card and weekly summaries of bill activities.  In addition to the two-hour a week class room component, students will be required to spend time at the Capitol Building, which can be reached by public transportation.   The seminar component will include guest speakers from the ACLU and the General Assembly.  This course is restricted to 16 students.  Upper level standing is required. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement.

245      Legislative Drafting (2)

This course focuses on the development of skills in (1) the drafting of statutes and/or ordinance, (2) advocacy in the legislative process, and (3) advocacy in the interpretation of statutes and ordinances. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement. Pre-requisite: Student should have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Legislation.

250      International Criminal Law (3)

This course is a writing and oral advocacy seminar for international criminal law.   The course will begin with lectures addressing the foundations of international criminal law, but will quickly progress to student presentations addressing specific international criminal law issues.  Each student will be required to write two papers, for a grade, and make an oral presentation to the class on at least one of those papers.  The format of the papers may vary, depending on the particular subject matter.  The subject matters will include the Nuremberg and Tokyo Trials, the Ad Hoc Tribunals of Yugoslavia and Rwanda, Torture, Sex Trade, Extradition, Terrorism and Piracy, Assassinations versus Targeting Killings, Narcotics Trade, and more.   Students should leave the course with an overall understanding of the international criminal law system. Prerequisites: LWRA I & II, Criminal Law. Satisfies upper level writing requirement. Limited to 12 students.

251      International Business Transactions & Writing (3)

Examination of selected problems in international trade, surveying some of the many issues encountered in private international transactions and emphasizing the options available to counsel engaged in the “preventative” practice of  law.   Primary  focus  will  be  on  recognizing  and  anticipating  potential  problems,  and  choosing  the  most appropriate form or structure for the business in order to manage the increased risk inherent in international transactions. Satisfies upper level writing requirement. Limited to 22 students.

255      Internet Law & Writing (3)

This course explores the legal issues arising out of the Internet’s growth as a personal, commercial and public tool. The course will focus on how traditional doctrines are applied to the novel context of the Internet. Areas covered include jurisdiction, free speech, trademark, copyright, privacy, contract, and hacking. A technical background is not required. Prerequisite: LWRA I & II. Satisfies upper level writing requirement. (eff. 11-09-2011)

260      Criminal Pretrial Practice & Procedure (2)

Using exercises that simulate the criminal pretrial experience, students will learn how to apply many of the lessons taught in the criminal law curriculum as they relate to the pretrial process. Students will learn how various aspects of the pretrial process – including client relationship building, bond hearings, preliminary hearings, investigation, discovery, and motions practice – are integrated during the process of preparing a case for trial. Because students will be required to draft memoranda and motions, this course will serve as an upper level writing course. This course differs from Georgia Pretrial Practice and Procedure in that it focuses on criminal law practice and uses simulated exercises to teach pre-trial preparation and advocacy.

270      Seminar – Scholarly Legal Writing & Editing (2)

In depth coverage of the basics of research, writing, and editing law review articles, comments, and student notes. Exploration of how to develop topic choice, research strategies, and structure and organization of scholarly writing. Analysis of legislation and use of legislative history in scholarly writing.  Enrollment in this seminar is restricted to Law Review students. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement.

First Year Required Courses Honors Program in Criminal Justice

107      Civil Procedure – HP (4)

Examination of questions of procedure including:  jurisdiction and venue; federal subject matter jurisdiction such as diversity and federal question jurisdiction; notice and code pleading; Federal Rules of Civil Procedure governing joinder of claims and parties; discovery; summary and default judgments; the right to a jury trial in civil matters; and issues of finality of judgments. Appropriate examples are drawn from Georgia law.

112      Contracts – HP (4)

Examination of the law of contracts including contract formation at common law and under the Uniform Commercial Code; consideration and other bases for enforcing promises; when a written instrument is required; parol evidence and interpretation; unconscionability and other defenses; rights of third parties; excuses for nonperformance; conditions, performance, and breach; and damages.

117      Real Property – HP (4)

Consideration of a variety of property-related topics, including some or all of the following: historical background; possessory,  and  non-possessory  interests  in  land  and  personal  property;  creation  and  transfer  of  property interests; concurrent estates; landlord and tenant law; public regulation of property; and eminent domain.

122      Torts – HP (4)

Examination of civil liability for interference with a broad array of legally protected interests, focusing on such topics as intentional wrongdoing, negligence, strict liability, causation, damages, wrongful death, and the law governing joint wrongdoers. Alternatives to the existing tort system may be discussed.

161      Criminal Law – HP (4)

Examination of criminalization, definition, classification, Actus Reus, attempt, conspiracy, agency, parties to crime, causation, felony murder, Mens Rea, limitations on criminal capacity, homicide, assault and battery, burglary, theft crimes, and defenses.

166      Criminal Procedure – HP (4)

Examination of the constitutional issues raised by pretrial law enforcement investigatory practices under the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The principle topics covered are search and seizure, confessions, self incriminations, identification procedures, the exclusionary rule, the right to counsel, and may include post-conviction processes.

207, 208          Legal Research, Writing & Analysis I, II – HP (3, 3)

LRWA I trains students in the structure of the U.S. legal system, hierarchy of legal authority, legal analysis, legal research, and legal citation.  Students also receive training in critical reading, critical thinking, classical logic, the structure of legal writing, and objective legal writing.  LRWA I culminates in the drafting of an office memorandum. LRWA II continues to build on the skills learned in LRWA I with assignments requiring more sophisticated legal analysis.  Focus is on persuasive legal writing and training in computer assisted legal research.  LRWA II culminates in the drafting of an appellate brief and an oral argument.

457, 458          Introduction to Criminal Justice I, II – HP (1,1)

Introduces students to the institutions and actors that shape our criminal justice system and explores many issues relevant to the administration of justice in our country. Students will examine how the various courses taught throughout the criminal law curriculum fit together within the criminal justice system and the role that lawyers play in defining this system.

459      Criminal Justice Lawyering:  The  Role  of  the  Lawyer  in  Promoting  Criminal  Justice Reform  (3)

In this course students will study the ideals that define our criminal justice system, the challenges that interfere with the professional’s ability to realize these ideals and the role of the lawyer in confronting these challenges.  The course will concentrate on the role of the prosecutor and defense counsel and consider strategies each might employ to live up to their obligations to the system in the face of systemic obstacles to do so.

Upper Division Required Courses Honor Program in Criminal Justice

467      Integrated Criminal Practice (6)

This course serves as a capstone course to the Criminal Law Honors Program required curriculum. Students will apply the lessons taught in criminal law, criminal procedure, advanced criminal procedure, and evidence in the context of a case problem. For the first half of this course students will engage in pretrial litigation through which they will be required to draft motions and responses relating to issues in the case and conduct hearings on the motions. For the second half of the course, students will be taught trial skills as they prepare and try the case. This course will satisfy the upper division writing requirement.  In addition to drafting and arguing pretrial motions, students may be required to draft jury instructions and/or trial briefs.

Electives:  Advanced Standing Required –  Business, Commercial & Property Law

305      Accounting for Lawyers (3)

Practical examination of today’s business environment, including the reading and understanding of financial statements and related accounting activities; an overview of business finance and investing activities; common business tax issues.

330      Payment Systems (3)

Examination of the law of negotiable instruments, bank deposits and collections, letter of credit, and the Federal Trade Commission holder-in-due-course regulations. Fund transfers, documents of title, investment securities, and the Electronic Fund Transfer Act of the Consumer Credit Protection Act are also covered in less detail.

334      Finance & Fraud:  Rights & Remedies (3)

Overview of financial markets including securitization and the use of debt and equity instruments.  Examination of one-sided and fraudulent practices connected with Enron, use of the Internet and its effect on contract remedies, and abuses associated with secured credit cards will be considered.  The course will also emphasize Georgia law regulating usury, pay day and title loans, the Deceptive Trade Practices Act, and debt collection as well as the protection of retirement and trust funds from the bankruptcy trustee.  Prerequisites:  Business Organizations, Sales & Secured Transactions or concurrent enrollment in Sales & Secured Transactions.

335      Bankruptcy (3)

Examination of debtor and creditor relations and federal tax issues flowing from that relationship. The Bankruptcy Code, Chapters 7, 11, and 13 as well as cases and related proceedings are also covered, as is practice and procedure in bankruptcy courts.

338      Business Planning (3)

Examination  of  selected  legal  problems  related  to  the  formation  and  organization,  financing,  operation, restructuring (shifting ownership interests among shareholders) and purchase and sale of various business enterprises. The various issues require the combined consideration and application of corporate, tax, and securities law, accounting and financial matters, and business consideration and strategies. The problems also raise pertinent questions regarding the relationship between the business client and counsel and attendant problems concerning an attorney’s professional responsibility. Students may be expected to prepare research memoranda and draft various legal documents.  Prerequisite:  Business Organizations.

339      Securities Regulation (3)

Examination of federal and state securities laws and the securities industry. Specific subjects dealt with include the functions of the Securities and Exchange Commission, registration and disclosure requirements and related civil liabilities, “blue-sky” laws, proxy solicitation and reporting requirements, broker-dealer regulation, the self- regulatory functions of the exchanges, and the regulation of investment companies.

340      Entertainment Law (3)

Examination of the body of law associated with the television, radio, film, recording, print, theater, and emerging technology industries.  Students learn how the law relates to the business structures, contractual relations, and internal practices of the entertainment industry.

345      Insurance Law (3)

The study of the insurance contract, insurable interest, the concept of indemnity, subrogation, other insurance clauses, valued policies, persons, and interests protected, omnibus clauses, public policy issues in auto liability insurance, problems in intention, causation, misrepresentations, stacking, bad faith, reasonable expectations, duty to defend, and insurance regulations.

353      Land Use Planning (2)

Examination of the law governing government regulation of land use. Subjects will include nuisance, zoning, constitutional issues of land use law (including First Amendment, equal protection, the Due Process and Takings Clauses of the Fifth Amendment) and other issues related to urban and suburban development.

355      Real Estate Finance (2)

Examination of the various legal aspects involved in development, use, ownership, and operation of real estate. Income tax and financing aspects of development of commercial and residential property are also examined.

360      Federal Income Taxation (3)

Examination of income subject to taxation, including analysis of Internal Revenue Code §61; the exclusion of gifts and inheritances; gain from dealings in property, annuities and life insurance proceeds; discharge of indebtedness, damages and related lawsuit receipts; separation and divorce and assignment of income.

365      Consumer Law (3)

This course provides the law student with an examination of consumer rights and remedies.  The course includes consumer protection issues relating to advertising, deceptive trade practices, debt collection, consumer credit and truth-in-lending. (eff 06-20-2010)

370      Corporate Taxation (3)

This course focuses on the study of the Federal taxation of corporations and shareholders. In addition to the general structure of the Federal corporate tax system, the topics include specific corporate tax sections of the Internal Revenue Code and issues relating to formation, structure, operation, distributions, dividends, redemptions, transfers of stock, liquidations, and taxable and tax-free reorganizations. (eff. 11-09-2011)

375      Wills, Trusts & Estates (3)

Examination of wills, testamentary and intestate disposition, administration of estates, private and charitable trusts, duties of trustees, and estate planning.

380      Estate and Gift Taxation (3)

This course focuses on the study of federal transfer taxes, including the estate tax, gift tax, and the generation- skipping tax.  In addition to the general structure of the federal transfer-tax system, the topics include specific transfer-tax  sections  of  the  Internal Revenue  Code  and  issues relating to  powers of  appointment, retained interests, marital transfers, expenses, and life insurance. (eff 11-13-13)

Electives:  Advanced Standing Required –  Employment, IP, Torts & Criminal Law

412      Seminar – Privacy Law (2)

Examination of the historical foundation and current status of privacy rights in America in the areas of tort and constitutional law. Limited to 20 students.

419      Employment Law (3)

Examination of the role of law other than law pertaining to employment discrimination in regulating the employer/employee relationship.  A primary focus of the course is the erosion of the at will employment doctrine through various tort and contract theories.  Other work place regulation laws, including the Family and Medical Leave Act, Fair Labor Standards Act, Occupational Safety and Health Act, Employee Retirement Income Security Act and the Whistle Blower Protection Provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act among others, will also be covered.

420      Employment Discrimination (3)

Comprehensive study of the various laws prohibiting discrimination in employment on the basis of race, gender, age, religion, national origin, and disability. Other employee rights laws are also covered.

425      Workers Compensation (3)

An in-depth examination of employees’ rights and employers’ duties under workers compensation laws, and wage and hour regulations.

430      Intellectual Property (3)

A survey course addressing the various legal protections for intellectual property.  A primary focus is on patents, including such topics as the right granted by a patent, determining whether an invention is patentable, and the processes for obtaining and enforcing patents.  Other intellectual property topics such as trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets are also examined.

431      Copyright Law (2)

Study of the Copyright Act, its history and development, the constitutional basis for federal exclusive jurisdiction, its application to new technologies, and practical issues in protecting the rights conferred by copyright law. Examination of related legal protections in the fields of Internet communications, web domains, and international copyright conventions.  The course considers problems related to the protections of artistic and creative property, including  a   study of the  methods for securing  and maintaining a copyright and the laws that govern the exploitation of copyrights.

432      Trademark Law (2)

Examination of common law and federal trademark law, including the acquisition, maintenance, and enforcement of rights, as well as the remedies available for infringement.  Unfair competition law doctrines such as “passing off” and “false designation of origin” will also be covered.  Developments in false advertising and an overview of the right of publicity, including the use of “sound-a-likes” and “look-a-likes” will be discussed.

433      Patent Law (2)

Examination of the nature of patents as property and the substantive law governing their enforceability in light of conflicting and historical views toward patents.  Focus on the statutory requirements for patentability and the extent  to  which  these  criteria  capture  the  nature  of  innovative  activity,  including  issues  that  arise  in  the enforcement stage, such as scope, defenses to infringement, and relationship to antitrust law.

434      Products Liability (3)

The study of liability and damages from defective products, manufacture or design defects, tort and contract related actions, strict liability, negligence, breach of warranty, applicable defenses, and damages. Issues presented by mass tort litigation are also covered.

435      Patent Drafting and Prosecution (2)

This course covers the application of patent doctrine to the procurement of patent protection from the United States Patent and Trademark Office.  Topics include the substantive law and procedure of drafting and prosecuting utility patent applications, strategies of drafting to obtain enforceable and defensible patent claims that can withstand  pre-litigation  and  litigation  challenges,  the  appeal  process,  and  post-issuance  administrative proceedings.  Students will learn to draft various documents necessary to obtain a United States patent and also receive some exposure to foreign counterpart patent protection.  Patent Law is a prerequisite for this course.

447      Corrections Law (3)

Primary emphasis is upon the judicial interface with institutional correctional facilities at the federal and state levels. In addition to studying the content of and rationale for specific judicial mandates, the course also considers the broader policy implications for correctional and judicial agencies dealing with correctional issues.  The course will familiarize students with the unique challenges in statutory correctional law at the state and federal levels.  In addition, this course will introduce students to the application and use of habeas corpus law within the context of constitutional violations of prisoners’ rights.

450      White Collar Crime (3)

An examination of criminal offenses such as RICO violations, employee theft, banking fraud, mail fraud, and other white-collar offenses. It also explores the procedural and substantive issues involved in the prosecution of these offenses. Prerequisites: Criminal Procedure and Criminal Law.

451      Seminar – Death Penalty (2)

Overview of modern American death penalty law with a special focus on Georgia law and procedure.  Topics will include  legal  issues  relevant  exclusively  to  the  death  penalty  and  general  criminal  law  issues  that  figure prominently in death penalty litigation.  All stages of death penalty litigation, including pre-trial procedure, pre-trial appeal, the two phases of trial, direct appeal, state habeas corpus, federal habeas corpus, and final appeals will be addressed.  Prerequisites:  Constitutional Law, Criminal Law & Criminal Procedure. Limited to 20 students

452      Seminar – Forensic Evidence (2)

Addresses topics relative to the expert witness including document examination, blood science and DNA analysis, bite and tool mark analysis, ballistics, truth detection, hair and fiber analysis, eyewitness testimony, statistics as evidence and Q-Sum analysis. Prerequisite: Evidence. (Pass/No Credit/Fail)

453      Advanced Evidence (3)

An exploration of scientific evidentiary issues that commonly arise in civil and criminal litigation, such as DNA, fingerprints, eyewitness identification, handwriting analysis, epidemiological research, toxicology, and radar and laser technology.  Using relevant case law and scientific principles, students will gain an understanding of how to determine when scientific evidence is justified, how much weight it should be given, and how to evaluate its credibility.  The course will also focus on the role of expert testimony as it relates to scientific evidence issues. Prerequisite:  Evidence

455      Advanced Criminal Procedure (3)

Examination of the criminal adjudication process from the time criminal charges are contemplated and filed through the sentencing and post-conviction phases of a criminal case.  The primary focus is on constitutional and related issues arising from the post-arrest aspects of the criminal process.  The course will cover the grand jury process and the role of prosecutorial discretion in charging decisions; various trial and sentencing issues, including:  pre- trial release and bail hearings; pre-trial discovery; speedy trial issues; the role of defense counsel; plea bargains and guilty pleas; the right to and role of a jury; trial rights, including the right to confront witnesses and to testify; double jeopardy; sentencing; and post-conviction relief.  Prerequisites: Criminal Law & Criminal Procedure.

462      Domestic Relations (3)

Examination of marriage, rights and liabilities of husband and wife, annulment and divorce, alimony, child support, property rights, adoption, rights of children, duties and rights of parents, and issues involving paternity. Privacy and due process constitutional issues specific to family law are covered.

463      Domestic Violence (2)

Introduction to the various legal implications of domestic violence with a focus on the impact of domestic violence on family law.  The course will explore the history and theory behind the evolution of domestic violence law in the United States and Georgia.  Students will explore the psychology of battering and the need to incorporate safety planning in case strategies.  Introduction to the different issues facing victims from various cultural, racial, and social groups.  Case studies will illustrate the intersection between domestic violence and various areas of the law such as torts, immigration, and criminal law.

477      Criminal Law Ethics (2)

Focuses on the criminal lawyer’s ethical and professional obligations to the client, the court, his adversaries, and society. Using the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility, students will use exercises and role play to explore how the lawyer successfully balances competing interests confronted in the practice of criminal law. This course building on the required Professional Responsibility course by focusing on those rules most applicable to the criminal law practitioner and how they are applied in the context of a criminal law practice.

497      Georgia Practice & Procedure (Criminal and Civil) (3)

An in-depth study of the statutory and constitutional framework of Georgia civil and criminal practice including the rules that govern pre-trial practice and conduct of a trial.

Electives:  Advanced Standing Required –  Public Law

505      Administrative Law (3)

Examination of the source of authority of administrative agencies; authority, and judicial review of agency actions, including  constitutional  and  legislative  limitations.  Federal  and  state  administrative  procedure  acts  are  also covered.

508      Health Care Law (3)

Introduction to the complex and evolving American health care system.  Provides a basic foundation for legal practice in the field of health care law.  This course will explore patients’ rights; access to care; legal liability of physicians; hospitals and managed care organizations; the structure of the health care system; and federal regulation and financing of the health care system.

510      Conflict of Laws (3)

Examination of the problem of choosing the law to be applied to transactions, relationships, or occurrences having contacts with more than one state in the United States or with the United States and a foreign nation. The course will also touch on adjudicatory jurisdiction, and recognition of foreign judgments.

512      Federal Courts (3)

Examination of the federal, constitutional and statutory provisions establishing and regulating federal courts. Congressional control over the judicial power, federal court relief against state and local government, and the substantive and procedure law that federal courts apply in civil actions are also covered.

514      Constitutional Law Seminar: The First Amendment (2)

This course will focus on political, artistic, and commercial speech; “symbolic” speech or expression; right of association; freedom of the press; freedom of assembly; the religion clauses; and the penumbras that give these freedoms life and substance.  In order to take the seminar, students must have taken Constitutional Law I and Constitutional Law II. Limited to 20 students.

515      Constitutional Torts (3)

Examination of the federal, constitutional and statutory provisions establishing and regulating federal courts. Congressional control over the judicial power, federal court relief against state and local government, and the substantive and procedure law that federal courts apply in civil actions are also covered.

519      Seminar – Constitutional Theory & Interpretation (2)

Students consider constitutional interpretive processes and theories such as originalism, intent, aspirational interpretation and the role of natural law, Kennedy’s historical analysis, reality decision-making, political decision- making,  and  new  recognition  of  federalism,  communitarianism,  environmental  feudalism  and  the  “thin” constitution. Prerequisites: Constitutional Law I, II. (Graded)

525      Education Law (3)

Education Law examines state and federal common, statutory and Constitutional law governing schools and schooling in the US.  We will consider such topics as special education, privacy, control of curriculum, freedom of speech & religion, desegregation, school violence, corporal punishment, accountability, governance, etc.  The class will focus on K-12 but will touch on some aspects of higher and preschool education.

535      Environmental Law (3)

Examination of the common law, constitutional, and statutory regimes of environmental law. Attention is given to the federal statutes governing air, water, the workplace environment, hazardous wastes and toxic substances, management of natural resource, and protection of biodiversity, endangered species, noise regulation and other restrictions.

545      Immigration Law (3)

Examination of the source and scope of the congressional power to regulate immigration; statutory provisions for immigration  status  based  on  family,  employment or  refugee status;  provisions for  admission,  removal  and expedited removal of non-citizens from the United States; and practice and procedure before the INS.

546      Immigration Clinic (4)

Examination of the source and scope of the congressional power to regulate immigration; statutory provisions for immigration  status  based  on  family,  employment or  refugee status;  provisions for  admission,  removal  and expedited removal of non-citizens from the United States; and practice and procedure before the INS. This course requires 1 hour in the classroom and additional work at the Immigration Clinic. Enrollment limited to 8 (eight) students. Students must have approval from Professors Turner and Rosen before registering for this course.

547      Seminar – Asylum & Refugee Law (3)

Detailed examination of the basics of asylum law and practical applications and pitfalls for potential immigration clients in the United States.  International Sources of Asylum Law, U.S. Asylum Law, Asylum & Withholding of Removal Procedures, the Convention Against Torture, and the Current State of Asylum Law in the 11th Circuit are also examined.  Pre-requisite: Immigration Law. Limited to 20 students.

555      Juvenile Law (3)

Analysis of rights of children with a focus upon both the balance between judicial discretion and legislative standards, and the tension between use of state intervention to regulate intra-familial relationships and the goal of minimizing the state’s usurpation of personal liberty.

560      Local Government Law (3)

This course provides an introduction to the organization and power of local governments, the interaction between such  governments  and  other  governmental  units  in  our  federal  system,  and  the  relationships  that  local governments have with residents and outsiders.

565      Labor Law (3)

Examination  of  the  right  to  organize;  organization  of  labor  unions,  strikes;  picketing;  boycotts,  collective bargaining; unfair labor practices of employers and unions; the union member and his union; the National Labor Relations Act and the Labor Management Relations Act; preemption of State regulation.

566      Public Sector Labor Law (3)

Examination of the organizational and collective bargaining rights of public sector employees with particular emphasis  on  dispute  resolution  and  with  special  attention  to  Georgia’s public  labor  management  laws  and practices.

580      Legislation (2)

An examination of the legislative process and statutory interpretation, including examination of how legislation is enacted; constitutional limitations upon legislative enactments; amendment, revision and repeal; the interrelationship  between  courts,  legislatures,  and  executive  officers;  and  the  interpretive  process  and  the principles and techniques which guide courts in that process.

Electives:  Advanced Standing Required –  Practice Oriented Skills

605      Advanced Legal Research (2)

Building on elementary legal research skills and through hands-on exercises, lectures and discussions, students learn advanced legal and non-legal research skills commonly utilized in the practice of law. Ethical matters and other thought-provoking topics are also addressed. Limited to 16 students.

610      Law Office Management (2)

Survey of the practical aspects of managing a law office, including setting up a law practice, dealing effectively with clients, billing procedures, case handling procedures, and efficiently using staff. Guest speakers present information on  a  variety  of  typical  small  office  cases,  such  as  bankruptcy,  domestic  relations,  and  basic  trial procedures. Limited to 25 students.

615      Estate Planning (3)

Building on knowledge gained in Wills, Trusts & Estates, students create estate plans and draft documents and provisions of complex documents in various client situations.  Prerequisite:  Wills, Trusts & Estates. Limited to 16 students.

620      Alternative Dispute Resolution (3)

In this class, students will learn about various approaches to dispute resolution, including negotiation, neutral evaluation, mediation, arbitration, dispute resolution systems, and contract clauses.  The course will emphasize mediation so that students have the option to satisfy training requirements for mediators in Georgia.  It will be heavily experiential – students will act as lawyers, clients, mediators, and arbitrators.   Students will do some writing, but this course does not meet the upper level writing requirement.

621      Arbitration (3)

A problem-oriented approach to the substantive common law and statute-based law of arbitration.  Coverage includes agreements to arbitrate and their enforceability under state and federal law; defenses to arbitration (including arbitrability, duress and unconscionability, consumer protection law, public interest, and successorship situations);  and  process  issues,  including  remedies  and  judicial  review.   Emphasis  is  on  arbitration  in  the commercial, labor and employment law contexts.  International arbitration may be included.  The course may include a substantial drafting component.

622      Mediation (2)

An exploration of the theoretical and practical aspects of negotiating and mediating transactions and disputes in our legal system.  Students will, through the study of negotiation and mediation theory, develop an understanding of the context in which particular negotiation and mediation strategies and tactics are successfully employed, resolve ethical issues, and develop proficiency in negotiation and mediation both as an advocate and a neutral.(Pass/Fail) Limited to 18 students.

630      Trial Advocacy (3)

Experiential course exploring fundamental advocacy skills and the theories, strategies, and techniques in preparing and presenting a criminal or civil case to a jury. From pre-trial motions through closing argument, including jury selection, opening statement, examination of witnesses and jury instructions, the students prepare for the concluding experience, a mock jury trial. Prerequisite: Evidence. Limited to 12 students.

631      Art of Advocacy (2)

This course imparts a thought process to precede the preparation of an advocacy attempt. It breaks the advocacy process into its component parts and illustrates the importance of each part by class exercises, which include non- lawsuit arguments, motion arguments, opening statements and pleas. (Pass/Fail)

632      Depositions (2)

Introduction to the theory and practice of taking and defending depositions of parties, lay witnesses and expert witnesses.  Provides training in preparation for depositions and opportunity to develop skills through extended simulations.  (Pass/Fail)  Limited to 16 students.

650      Client Interviewing & Counseling (2)

Provides training in the techniques of interviewing and counseling clients to identify and solve legal problems. Through a theoretical framework for and experiences with simulated exercises, verbal and non-verbal skills are honed through lecture, demonstrations, discussion, role playing, simulations, practical exercises, and critiques. (Pass/Fail) Limited to 16 students.

651      Negotiations (2)

Explores the theoretical and practical aspects of negotiation as a means of dispute resolution and focuses on the techniques,  strategies,  tactics,  and  ethical  restraints  and  responsibilities  of  the  lawyer. Students engage  in exercises, reviews, and critiques. (Pass/Fail)  Limited to 16 students.

655      Georgia Practice & Procedure (2)

In-depth study of the statutory and constitutional framework of Georgia civil practice, including venue, personal, and subject matter jurisdiction, service of process, and the rules of evidence.

660      Externship (2-6)

Involves  a  field  placement  under  the  supervision  of  a judge  or  a  practicing  attorney  in  a  corporate  legal department, governmental agency or public interest agency.  Field placements that involve litigation are open only to third-year students who are eligible to practice under Georgia’s Third-Year Practice Act.  Eligible students must have successfully completed all first year courses, be in good academic standing and have at least a 2.00 GPA. Students must perform 47 hours of legal work for each credit hour and participate in a classroom component with the faculty supervisor.  Interested students are encouraged to consult with the faculty supervisor for further information.  (Pass/Fail)

661      Micronesian Externship (Fall Semester, 3-6)

The Micronesian Externship Program places students in legal offices throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of Palau, and the Territory of Guam. Students work under the supervision of attorneys practicing for the government or in the public interest sector. Eligible students must have successfully completed all first-year courses, be in good academic standing and have at least a 2.00 GPA. Students must perform 47 hours of legal work for each credit hour and participate in a classroom component with the faculty supervisor prior to departing for Micronesia. Interested students are encouraged to consult with the faculty supervisor for further information. (Pass/Fail)

662      Micronesian Externship (Spring Semester, 12)

The Micronesian Externship Program places students in legal offices throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of Palau, and the Territory of Guam. Students work under the supervision of attorneys practicing for the government or in the public interest sector. Eligible students must have successfully completed all first-year courses, be in good academic standing and have at least a 2.00 GPA. Students must perform 47 hours of legal work for each credit hour and participate in a classroom component with the faculty supervisor prior to departing for Micronesia. Interested students are encouraged to consult with the faculty supervisor for further information. (Pass/Fail)

663      HP Externship

This is an Externship for third year Students enrolled in the Honors Program in Criminal Justice.  It provides an opportunity to apply curriculum lessons in a criminal law placement, such as criminal courts, juvenile law and advocacy agencies, public defenders offices, prosecutor’s offices and municipal and state agencies.   Eligible students must have successfully completed all first and second year courses, be in good academic standing in the Honors Program in Criminal Justice, and completed all first and second year courses, be in good academic standing in the Honors Program in Criminal Justice, and have at least a 2.00 GPA.  Students must perform 47 hours of legal work for each credit hour and participate in a classroom component with the faculty supervisor. (Pass/Fail)

670      Advanced Bar Studies (2)

This is a skills development course providing students with an intensive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam, and uses problems and exercises in a bar exam format to familiarize students with techniques for answering multiple choice (MBE) questions and analyzing, organizing, and writing essay and multistate performance (MPT) questions.  (Pass/Fail)

680      Writing for MPT (2)

A review and reinforcement of analytical writing skills, with the goal of preparing students for the Multi-State Performance Test portion of the bar exam.  Topics will include logic, factual analysis, case-synthesis, large-scale organization, small-scale organization, time-management skills, and legal analysis.

Electives:  Advanced Standing Required –  Interdisciplinary

705      Jurisprudence (3)

Introduction to the philosophy of law and the legal process. Designed to give students theoretical understanding of the origin and development of Jurisprudence in general; beginning with Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and the Bible; and including the works of various political and legal theorists covering the Classical Age, the Middle Age, the Modern Age, and the Twentieth Century. The course addresses selected philosophies, such as natural theory, legal positivism, legal realism, formalism, and utilitarianism, amongst others.

710      Law and Economics (3)

In-depth study of restitution and contract remedies; the theory of efficient breach; and an overview of law and economics.

715      The Making of the Constitution (3)

This is a three-hour course exploring the making of the U.S. Constitution through a study of the founding convention, the ratification debates, and the framing and ratification of the Reconstruction Amendments.

720      American Legal History (3)

This course provides the law student with an overview of the American legal history from colonial times through the civil rights era. The student will be given an opportunity to study early constitutionalism, the revolution, the antebellum codification movement, the end of slavery, the regulatory state, and rights of women and minority groups. (eff 06-20-2010)

721      Constitutional Legal History (3)

This course will consider the creation and development of the United States Constitution in relation to civil and human rights. In it we seek to discover the root ideals animating the Constitution as a civil/human rights charter and to contrast those ideals with their practical results when applied to the various people-groups coming under its influence during the period studied: property owners (and their opposite), Aboriginal (Native) Americans, women, “slaves,” and children. The purpose is to gain an understanding of the contrast between the philosophical Constitution and the real one, placing present-day civil rights discourse in a useful historical context and advancing our legal thinking on constitutionalism, both generally and in the American context.

722      Law, Lawyers and Literature (3)

Law and literature contextualizes law within a framework for interpretation through the arts, most specifically, but not limited to, written literature. The course encompasses a variety of perspectives from which to construct a broader societal context within which to conceptualize the law, including law in literature and law as literature. Studying law in literature examine the way in which legal situations are presented in literature. Through well- known and lesser-known literary works in a variety of genres selected by the instructor, the course will stimulate critical thought, synthesis of themes derived from diverse sources, and appreciation of the political and social contexts in which the law operates. Law as literature views legal texts themselves as a form of literature, which permits a re-examination of those texts using methods of literary critique and literary analysis. Among the goals of this course are to enhance students’ appreciation of law’s impact on society and law’s response to societal problems, and to improve the analytic and communication skills of students by introducing them to the tools of literary analysis and criticism. (eff. 10-19-2011)

Electives:  Advanced Standing Required –  Comparative/International

810      International Business Transactions (3)

Examination of selected problems in international trade, surveying some of the many issues encountered in private international transactions and emphasizing the options available to counsel engaged in the “preventative” practice of  law.   Primary  focus  will  be  on  recognizing  and  anticipating  potential  problems,  and  choosing  the  most appropriate form or structure for the business in order to manage the increased risk inherent in international transactions.

811      International Civil Litigation (3)

Examination of the problems of conducting civil litigation across national boundaries.  Topics for examination include jurisdictional, service, discovery, and parallel proceedings issues; issues arising out of international commercial disputes including international commercial arbitration and enforcement of arbitral awards; and issues presented when nations are parties to international lawsuits, including questions of sovereign immunity, and the Foreign Sovereign Immunity Act.

815      Public International Law (3)

Public international law is the law governing nations in their relations with each other. It has existed in one form or another since ancient times.  It now encompasses many subject areas, including such critical and timely ones as diplomatic relations; the use of armed force by and against states; terrorism and permissible responses to it; protection of non-combatants in war; the recognition of new national states and governments; the rights and duties of states; international human rights; international organizations such as the United Nations; the law of the seas; international environmental law; and international criminal law.  Public international law is critically important to the United States, not only to government entities such as the State and Defense and Justice Departments, but also increasingly to private lawyers.  It is very often invoked and applied in US courts, state and federal.  It is unique among branches of the law taught in American law schools, in its nature, sources, scope, and standards and methods of applicability.   Each semester we study the basic foundations of public international law and then proceed to focus on some combination of the above topics as indicated by available time and class interest.

817      Comparative Criminal Procedure (2)

This course will review the various aspects of criminal procedure including non-jury trials, pre-trial proceedings, and post-trial appeals in Europe.  This course will provide the student with an opportunity to explore criminal procedure issues and make a comparison with the criminal justice process in the United States and various European nations.   The course will also provide a comparison of the aims of criminal procedure, general principles governing criminal procedure, rights of the accused, phases of criminal process, agencies involved in the criminal justice system, other participants in the criminal process, sources of evidence, finality, special forms of procedure, consensual disposal and proposals for reform in Europe and the United States. (eff 06-20-2010)

820      European Union Law (3)

A study and analysis of substantive EEC law within the framework of an understanding of the complex socio- economic and political environment within which the Treaty of Rome is to be implemented, starting with the reasons for the formation of the EEC and the institutions of the EEC, including: free movement of goods, internal taxation, quantitative restrictions, competition law, free movement of capital, services and people. The course also covers EEC external relations with several countries or groups of countries.

Electives:  Advanced Standing Required –  Student Programs

910      AAJ Mock Trial Competition (1)

This is a national trial skills competition sponsored by the American Association for Justice.  The regional rounds for this competition usually take place during the Spring Semester.  Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

911      Georgia Intra State Moot Court Competition (1)

This appellate advocacy competition, sponsored by the Georgia Young Lawyers Division, involves all five Georgia Law Schools.  This Competition usually takes place during the Spring Semester. Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

912      William W. Daniel National Mock Trial Competition (1)

This Atlanta based competition, which draws schools from across the country, is sponsored by the Georgia Young Lawyers Division.  This competition usually takes place during the Fall Semester.  Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

913      South Texas Mock Trial Challenge (1)

The tournament will honor the memory of legendary Houston trial lawyer, John O’Quinn, and the problem will focus on contemporary medical-legal issues. During the four-day event, teams will argue a minimum of three rounds before panels of prestigious judges, attorneys, and law faculty.

915      National  NYC Bar Association Moot Court Competition (1)

This long-running national appellate advocacy competition is sponsored by the Bar Association of the City of New York.  The regional rounds for this competition usually take place during the Fall Semester.  Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

919      Texas Young Lawyers Competition (1)

The regional rounds for this national trial skills competition usually take place during the Spring Semester. Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

920      Frederick Douglass Moot Court Competition (1)

This national appellate advocacy competition is sponsored by the National Black Law Students Association and focuses on civil rights issues.   This competition is usually scheduled during early part of the Spring Semester. Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

921      John Gibbons Moot Court Competition (1)

This national appellate advocacy competition is sponsored by Seton Hall Law School and focuses on criminal procedure issues.  This competition is usually scheduled during the Spring Semester.  Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

922      ABA Negotiation Competition (1)

This national competition involves teams of two students negotiating a hypothetical problem against a team from another law school.  The object of the competition is for the team to effectively and professionally negotiate on behalf of their client to reach an agreement with the other side.  This competition usually takes place during the early part of the Fall Semester.  Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

923      Foreign Direct Investment International Arbitration Moot Court Competition (1)

The FDI Moot involves a hypothetical case in connection with an investment by a private investor in a foreign host state.  The FDI Moot spans a period of approximately six months each year and has two phases:  the writing of memoranda for claimant and respondent and the hearing of oral argument based upon the memoranda.

924      ABA Labor & Employment Law Mock Trial Competition (1)

This is a national trial skills competition that focuses on labor and employment law issues. This competition usually takes place during the Fall Semester.  Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

925      ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition Team (1)

This is one of the largest appellate advocacy competitions in the United States.  The subject matter for this competition changes every year.  This competition usually takes place during the Spring Semester.

926      Emory National Civil Rights and Liberties Competition (1)

This national appellate advocacy competition, sponsored by Emory Law School, focuses on a Civil Rights and Liberties issue.  This competition usually takes place during the early part of the Fall Semester.  Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

927      Elon National Constitutional Law Competition (1)

A national moot court competition focusing on Constitutional law issues, typically in the Spring semester.

928      Transactional LawMeet Competition (1)

This national competition involves teams of three students (two primary competitors and one alternate) negotiating a  hypothetical  transactional  problem  against  teams  from  one  or  more  other  law  schools.    There  are  two components to the competition.  In the first phase, students are required to (1) draft a contract on behalf of their assigned client; and (2) review and mark up contracts from other teams representing the party on the other side of the transaction.  In the second phase, teams compete in person regionally in live negotiation rounds.  Finalists from regional rounds compete in a final national round.  The competition usually takes place during the winter break and the early part of Spring Semester.   Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

930      ABA Client Interviewing & Counseling Competition Team (1)

This national competition involves a team of two students interviewing and counseling a hypothetical client.  The competition requires the team to obtain the client’s story and engage in a collaborative problem-solving process with the client.  This competition usually takes place during the Spring Semester.

940      Stetson National Pretrial Competition Team (1)

This national competition is sponsored by Stetson Law School and focuses on writing, trial, and oral advocacy skills. This competition is usually scheduled during the Fall Semester. Students selected to participate as members of this team may receive academic credit for successful completion of this competition.

950      Southern Illinois Invitational Mock Trial Competition (1)

990      Directed Research (2)

Comprehensive individual research projects under supervision of a faculty member resulting in a scholarly paper. Topic and unit credit must be approved in advance.  See Academic Code Section 705. (Pass/Fail)

Open 2014-2015 Master Course List in PDF

*Master Course List 2014-2015 updated 7/12/14.

2013-2014 Academic Year

Open 2013-2014 Master Course List in PDF

Open 2013-2014 Master Course List in Website

2012-2013 Academic Year

Open 2012-2013 Master Course List in PDF