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“John Marshall’s externship program offers quality field placements that develop professional and practical skills while ensuring  successful and meaningful on-the-job performance.” Paul Nam, Graduate (’12)

Michael D. Oeser

Michael D. Oeser

Associate Professor

moeser@johnmarshall.edu

404-872-3593 Ext. 115

Education

B.A., University of Houston
J.D., University of Wisconsin Law School
LL.M., University of Wisconsin Law School

Courses Taught

Legal Writing I & II; Transactional Drafting; Business Organizations

Career Highlights

Professor Oeser joined AJMLS’s faculty in August 2011, having previously taught at the University of Houston Law Center (adjunct professor, Legal Writing I & II), Southern University Law Center (Assistant Professor, Legal WritingI & II), and Florida A&M University College of Law (Visiting Assistant Professor, Contracts I & II and Business Organizations). His primary scholarly interests are legal writing, federal Indian law, tribal law, and civil rights. He serves as an Associate Justice on the Southwest Intertribal Court of Appeals. Professor Oeser has been admitted to practice before the State Bar of Texas, Wisconsin State Bar, Ho-Chunk Nation Bar, Cherokee Nation Bar, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, all Wisconsin Federal District Courts, Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, the Seventh Circuit Courts of Appeals, and United States Supreme Court.

Publications

Tribal Citizen Participation in State and National Politics: Welcome Wagon or Trojan Horse?, 36 Wm. Mitchell L. Rev. 793 (2010).

Citizenship, Race, Sovereignty and Symbiosis: An Analysis of Tribal Citizenship Criteria (in progress; tentative submission Fall 2011).

Our Peripatetic Society and the Anti-Establishment Clause: The Problem with Van Orden’s “Time Without Challenge” Test (in progress; tentative submission Fall 2011).

PRESENTATIONS AND SYMPOSIA

Tribal Citizen Participation in State and National Politics: Welcome Wagon or Trojan Horse?,Southern University Law Center’s 2010-11 Speaker Series (Baton Rouge, La., Feb. 25, 2011).
Tribal Citizen Participation in State and National Politics: Welcome Wagon or Trojan Horse?, State Bar of Texas Bar Indian Law Section Meeting (Austin, Texas, Jan. 14, 2011).

Citizenship, Race, Sovereignty and Symbiosis: A Critique of Tribal Citizenship Practices, 2009 Coming Together of The Peoples Conference, University of Wisconsin Law School Madison, Wis., March 27, 2009) (Keynote Panel with Cherokee Nation Chief Chad Smith).

Mitigating Emotional Barriers to Student Performance: Strategies for New Legal Writing Professors, Rocky Mountain Legal Writing Conference, S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah (Salt Lake City, Utah, March 22, 2008).

SIGNIFICANT CASES

State of Wisconsin ex. rel. Hensley v. Endicott, 245 Wis. 2d 607, 629 N.W.2d 686 (2001).