Title IX Policy

Introduction

Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School is committed to providing a successful learning and working environment for all members of its community, free from any sexual misconduct or harassment.  The Law School regards such behavior as a violation of the standard of conduct required of all students.

Purpose

This policy provides a grievance procedure for students with complaints of sexual misconduct.

What is Sexual Misconduct?

Sexual misconduct can occur in many forms, including but not limited to, sexual harassment, domestic violence, intimate partner violence, sexual assault and stalking. Sexual misconduct is unlawful, and clearly inconsistent with the nature of a professional community.

Federal Law and Policy that Prohibit Sexual Misconduct:

The AJMLS Sexual Misconduct Policy strictly prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct by any member of the AJMLS faculty, administration, student body, or volunteers. This policy has been developed in accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 to protect students from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions of higher learning.

The AJMLS policy is available here.

Who is Protected?

This policy applies to all students and all programs affiliated with the Law School, including domestic and international internships and externships and international programs. Men as well as women are protected, including when the harasser and victim are of the same sex, and regardless of either’s sexual orientation or gender identity.

Who do I contact if I think I have experienced sexual misconduct?

Students should contact Title IX Coordinator, Dean Sheryl Harrison Mercer, if they believe they have experienced sexual misconduct. However, students requiring urgent care or those off-campus should immediately call 911.

What will be done?

There are numerous options for students on-campus who have experienced sexual misconduct. The Office of Student Affairs and Pro Bono Programs offers various types of advocacy including a formal investigation and final resolution, individual support, counseling, and the opportunity to file an official report with the police and with AJMLS Security. Students who file a formal report with the Title IX Coordinator are NOT required to file a criminal report. Students may speak with the Campus Victim Advocate who will keep all information in confidence if requested by the student.

Things to remember:

  1. If you are a victim, it is not your fault.
  2. Do not be afraid to ask for help.
  3. The Office of Student Affairs and Pro Bono Programs is here to support you.

Local Resources:

  • Atlanta Police
  • Cascade House
  • Clayton County Association on Battered Women
  • Dekalb Rape Crisis Center
  • Grady Rape Crisis Center
  • Fulton County Sheriff Office
  • Salvation Army Shelter
  • United Way

Campus Resources:

  • Title IX Coordinator. Dean Sheryl Harrison Mercer
  • Title IX Investigator, Hope L. Jamison
  • The Office of Student Affairs and Pro Bono Services
  • Counseling Services
  • Campus Security

Sexual Misconduct Defined

TITLE IX: SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School is committed to providing a successful learning and working environment for all members of its community, free from any sexual misconduct or harassment. The Law School regards such behavior as a violation of the standard of conduct required of all students. In addition to facing sanctions from the Law School for violation of its policy on sexual misconduct, a person who engages in sexual misconduct may be held personally liable to the victim and subject to sanctions independent of those imposed by the Law School. The Dean of Students shall serve as the contact person for all complaints made against Atlanta’s John Marshall students under this policy.

Title IX Coordinator
Dean Sheryl Harrison-Mercer
(678)916-2681
Sharrison-mercer@johnmarshall.edu

Title IX Investigator
Assistant Dean Hope L. Jamison
(678)916-2682
hjamison@johnmarshall.edu

Campus Security
(404) 380-4240 cell
(678) 916-2699
security@johnmarshall.edu

SEXUAL MISCONDUCT DEFINED

Sexual misconduct can occur in many forms, including, but not limited to, sexual harassment, sexual violence, intimate partner violence, and stalking.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Sexual harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment may include, for example, an attempt to coerce an unwilling person into a sexual relationship; repeatedly subjecting a person to egregious, unwelcome sexual attention or advances; punishing a refusal to comply with a sex-based request; and conditioning a benefit on submission to sexual advances. It also includes sexual violence or sexual assault, intimate partner violence, stalking, and gender-based bullying. Sexual violence is a form of sexual harassment.

SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Sexual violence refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent (e.g., due to the person’s age or use of drugs or alcohol, or because an intellectual or other disability prevents the person from having the capacity to give consent). A number of different acts fall into the category of sexual violence, including rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual abuse, and sexual coercion.

INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

Intimate partner violence is physically, sexually and/or psychologically abusive behavior used by one individual to maintain power and control over an intimate partner. Intimate partner relationships are relationships between parties who are dating, cohabitating, married, separated, or divorced. Relationship violence can occur in same-sex or opposite-sex relationships.

STALKING

Stalking is following, placing under surveillance, or contacting another person without the consent of that person for the purpose of harassing and intimidating him or her. The term “contact” means to make or attempt to make any communication, including, but not limited to, communication in-person, by telephone, by mail, by broadcast, by computer or computer network, or by any other electronic device. “Harassing and intimidating” refers to communication directed at a person that causes emotional distress because of a reasonable fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others and that serves no legitimate purpose. It does not require that an overt threat of death or bodily injury be made.

Dealing with the effects of sexual misconduct can leave a person feeling overwhelmed, humiliated, angry or helpless. If you have been the victim of sexual misconduct, you are encouraged to seek medical attention and explore your reporting options. There are several resources that can assist you in exploring these options. Below you will find a list of suggestions on what survivors should do following an assault:

  1. SEEK SAFETY. Make sure you are safe from further harm. Call someone you trust, such as a friend.
  2. SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION. After sexual misconduct, it is important to get a check-up to make sure that you are not injured. There may be internal injuries that are not visible to you. Medical providers are not required to report your assault and will keep your information private, if that is your preference. You do not need to formally report the incident to the Law School or the police to seek medical attention or support services.
  3. OBTAIN A FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAMINATION. Within 72 hours of the assault, survivors have the option of obtaining a forensic medical examination. A forensic medical exam is a collection of evidence performed by a specially-trained medical professional in a hospital or other medical facility. Before your forensic exam do not bathe, douche, urinate, smoke, eat, drink or brush your teeth, if at all possible. If you have already changed clothes, place them in a paper bag (plastic destroys evidence). If you have not changed, keep the original clothes on and take an extra set with you to wear home from the hospital.
  4. SEEK COUNSELING. Experiencing an act of sexual misconduct can be a very traumatic experience that may cause the survivor to experience a wide range of thoughts and emotions even long after the incident occurs. With time and support things can get better. Do not be afraid to ask for help. The Law School offers licensed counselors, free of charge, to assist in the healing process. The contact information for our counselors is below:
 

Counseling Services on Campus

 

Counseling Services off Campus

Sunamita Tuple, LPC

(678) 929-4679

(404) 610 – 2007 (cell)

Joel Baker, LMFT

(678) 948-8057

Joel@joelBakerCounseling.com

 

A temporary protective order (“TPO”) is a court order to help protect you from someone who is abusing, threatening or harassing you. The order will require the abuser to stay away from you, your home and your work. The abuser will be prohibited from contacting you in any way. The court can also order the abuser to stay away from your children if the court feels they are at risk. The court can also order other types of relief in the TPO, such as temporary custody, support, and possession of vehicles. Getting a TPO does not mean the abuser goes to jail. The TPO makes it easier for the police to arrest the abuser for coming near you later, even if the abuser does not hurt you again.

If you are experiencing or have experienced stalking, dating violence, domestic violence, or family violence, please consider filing for a protective order. The State of Georgia defines family violence as certain kinds of crimes between people who have a familiar connection to each other. These crimes include battery or assault, stalking, criminal damage to property, unlawful restraint, criminal trespass, or any felony. For the act to fall within the definition of family violence, the people involved must be connected to each other as past or present spouses, parents of the same child, parents and children, stepparents and stepchildren or other persons living or who formerly lived in the same household. If the crime is stalking, the perpetrator and victim do not have to have any connection to each other.

Judges in the state of Georgia generally will not issue a TPO unless there was a recent threat of physical abuse or physical violence. The temporary protective order must be filed in the county where the abuser resides. If the abuser lives out of state, the TPO may be filed in the Georgia county where you live or where the violence occurred. You will need to go to the Superior Clerk’s office and tell the clerk you want to file for a temporary protective order. The clerk will give you the paperwork to complete. You must know the abuser’s name and current work and/or home address. The clerk will then take you to talk to a judge about your case. You must be ready to tell the judge about the violence that has occurred. The judge will want to know if you believe the abuse will continue. If the judge grants a TPO, the order will be served on the abuser. A hearing will be held within 30 days. Both you and the abuser will be required to attend the hearing to determine if the order will be extended. At that hearing, the judge will decide if the TPO should be extended for up to 12 months. The judge can also decide other issues such as temporary custody, support for your children, and support for you, or substance abuse treatment for your abuser. If there is a new threat of violence before the TPO expires, you can go back to court and ask that the order be extended or made permanent. Family violence causes many complex problems – legal, physical, emotional, and financial. TPOs can help you resolve some of these problems, but not all.

You may contact your local family violence shelter or legal aid office for advice or help with family violence problems. Please see the lists below:

Clayton County

Association of Battered Women of Clayton County (Securus House) (770) 961-7233

Clayton County Superior Court (770) 477-3405

Cobb County

YWCA of Cobb County Battered Women’s Program (770) 427-3390

Cobb Family Resources (770) 428-2601

 DeKalb County

Women’s Resource Center (404) 688-9436

DeKalb Superior Court (404) 371-2836

Fulton County

Partnership Against Domestic Violence  (404) 873-1766

Fulton Superior Court (404) 730-5344

Gwinnett County

Partnership Against Domestic Violence  (770) 806-8873

Gwinnett County Superior Court (770) 822-8100

Statewide Referrals
Domestic Violence Statewide Referral Hotline 1-800-334-2836

Immigrants
Catholic Social Services (404) 881-6571

Atlanta Legal Aid Society Hispanic Outreach Project (404) 377-5381

St. Joseph’s Mercy Mobile Spanish (404) 851-7777

Vietnamese (404) 851-5500

 

You may contact one of the Legal Aid Offices below if you have additional questions or require assistance with obtaining an order of protection:


DeKalb County

246 Sycamore Street, Suite 120

Decatur, GA 30030

(404) 377-0701

 Clayton County Pro Bono Project

1000 Main Street

Forest Park, GA 30050

(404) 366-0586

Cobb County

30 S. Park Square

Marietta, GA 30090

(770) 528-2565

Fulton County

151 Spring Street, N.W.

Atlanta, GA 30303

(404) 524-5811

South Fulton & Clayton Counties

1514 East Cleveland Avenue, Suite 100

East Point, GA 30344

(404) 669-0233

Gwinnett County

180 Camden Hill Road, Suite A

Lawrenceville, GA 30045

 

REPORTING TO VICTIM ADVOCATES

The Law School also has victim advocates who are trained to provide assistance to students who experience sexual violence. While the victim advocates are not professional, licensed counselors and  cannot maintain a complainant’s confidentiality to the same extent that a professional, licensed counselor can, they are available to provide valuable sources of support for a complainant.

Faculty Victim Advocate:

Helen de Haven, Associate Professor

Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School
1422 W. Peachtree St. NW
Atlanta, Georgia 30309

P: (678) 916-2635

M: (404) 825-8376

hdehaven@johnmarshall.edu

Peer Victim Advocate:

Kayla Kudratt, Juris Doctorate Candidate

Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School
1422 W. Peachtree St. NW
Atlanta, Georgia 30309

P: (678) 916-2680
M: (678) 458-8063 (after hours)

kkudratt@johnmarshall.edu

 

Surviving domestic violence can be stressful, confusing, and frustrating. Healing the emotional wounds can take much longer than healing from physical wounds. The following resources can guide you through the systems and resources that are available in the metro-Atlanta area.

24-HOUR HOTLINES

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Hotline

1(800) 729-6686

DeKalb Rape Crisis Center 

(404) 377-1428

Spanish: (404) 377-1429

First Call for Help (United Way)

(404) 614-1000 or 211

Fulton County Child Protective Services 

(404) 699-4399

Fulton Emergency Mental Health Services

(404) 730-1600

Georgia Crisis and Access Line

1(866) 821-0465

Georgia Domestic Violence Hotline

1(800) 33-HAVEN

Governor’s Victim Assistance Helpline

1(800) 338-6745

Grady Rape Crisis Center

(404) 616-4861

International Women’s House (for refugee & immigrant women) 

(770) 413-5557

National Domestic Violence Hotline

1(800) 799-7233

National Hotline for Missing and Exploited Children 

1(800) 843-5678

Partnership Against Domestic Violence (Fulton) 

(404) 873-1766

Prevent Child Abuse Georgia

1(800) CHILDREN

Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network

1(800) 656-HOPE

Suicide Prevention Center Hotline

1(800) SUICIDE (784-2433)

Task Force for the Homeless

(404) 589-9495 or (800) 448-0636
TTY/Hearing Impaired: (404) 730-1608

United 4 Safety (GLBTQQIDV support)

(404) 200-5957

 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SAFEHOUSES

Most domestic violence shelters also serve victims from other counties and provide services such as shelter, support groups, counseling, legal advocacy, and food and clothing at no fee.

Cherokee Family Violence Center

(770) 479-1703

Clayton County Association on Battered Women/ Securus House

(770) 961-7233

Cobb County YWCA of Northwest Georgia

(770) 427-3390

DeKalb County Women’s Resource Center

(404) 688-9436

Douglas County S.H.A.R.E. House

(770) 489-7513

Forsyth County Family Haven

(770) 889-6384

Fulton Partnership Against Domestic Violence

(404) 873-1766

Gwinnett Partnership Against Domestic Violence

(770) 963-9799

Haven House (includes Henry and Spalding counties)

(770) 954-9229

International Women’s House

(770) 413-5557

Project Renewal (Conyers-Rockdale/ Newton/Walton)

(770) 860-1666

 

INDIVIDUAL & FAMILY COUNSELING

Atlanta Area Psychological Associates

(770) 730-9930

Catholic Charities (Spanish speaking counselors available)

(404) 885-7425

Center for Pan Asian Community Services (Korean, Vietnamese, Chinese, Japanese, Laotian, Thai, Filipino)

(770) 936-0969

DeKalb Rape Crisis Center
(404) 377-1428

Families First (Offices in Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fulton, Gwinnett, and Rockdale counties)

(404) 853-2800

Fulton County Behavioral Health Access and Information Line

(404) 730-1688

Georgia Crisis and Access Line

1(866) 821-0465

Fulton County Solicitor’s Office Victim Assistance Program

(404) 612-6883

Georgia Center for Children (child sexual abuse counseling)

(678) 904-2880

Grady Rape Crisis Center

(404) 616-4861

Grady Psychiatric Emergency Room

(404) 616-4762

Heartwork Counseling Center

(404) 658-1222

Link Counseling Center
(404) 256-9797

Karuna Counseling for Women
(404) 321-4307

Metropolitan Counseling Services

(404) 321-1794

North Atlanta Counseling Services

(770) 998-0989

Northside Behavioral Health Center

(404) 851-8960

Odyssey Family Counseling (Hapeville, College Park, McDonough)

(404) 768-1156

Refugee Family Services

(404) 299-2243

Shalom Bayit/ Jewish Family & Career Services

(770) 677-9322

 

LOCAL/REGIONAL/NATIONAL CONTACTS:

Georgia Network to End Sexual Assault

(866) 354-3672

http://www.gnesa.org/

Georgia Office of Victim Assistance

(404) 559-4949

http://www.georgia.gov/00/channel/0,2141,4802_5045,00.html

Criminal Justice Coordinating Council – Victim Services

(800) 547-0060

http://cjcc.ga.gov

Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network (RAINN)

HOTLINE: 1-800-656-HOPE

http://www.rainn.org/

HODAC, Georgia Victim’s Assistance Helpline

1(800) 338-6745

http://www.hodac.org/ 14

Criminal Justice Coordinating Council – Victim Services

(800) 547-0060
http://cjcc.ga.gov

Georgia Legal Services Program

(404) 206-5175 or (800) 498-9469

Georgia Domestic Violence Hotline

(800) 334-2836 (toll free)

www.gcadv.org

Tapestri (a refugee and immigrant coalition against domestic violence)

(404) 299-2185

www.tapestri.org

National Domestic Violence Hotline

1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

 

LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES:

(use 911 for emergencies; for information, use the numbers listed below)

Atlanta Police

(404) 614-6544

Alpharetta Police

(678) 297-6300

Chattahoochee Hills Police

(770) 463-8801

College Park Police

(404) 761-3131

East Point Police

(404) 761-2177

Fairburn Police

(770) 964-1441

Fulton County Marshall

(404) 612-4493

Fulton County Police

(404) 613-5700

Fulton Felony Probation (DOC)

(404) 656-4600

Fulton Misdemeanor Probation

(JCS) (404) 591-3180
Fulton County Sheriff’s Office
(404) 612-5100

Fulton County Warrant Office

(404) 613-4752

Georgia State University Police Department

(404) 413-2100

Hapeville Police

(404) 768-7171

Johns Creek Police Department

(678) 474-1600

Milton Police Department

(678) 242-2570

Palmetto Police

(770) 463-9068

Roswell Police

(770) 640-4100

Sandy Springs Police

(770) 551-6900

Union City Police Department

(770) 306-6862

 

VICTIM-WITNESS ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

DeKalb County Solicitor’s Office VWAP

(404) 371-2201

DeKalb County District Attorney VWAP

(404) 371-2567

Fulton County Solicitor’s Office VWAP

(404) 612-6883

Fulton County District Attorney VWAP

(404) 612-4986

Johns Creek Police Department

(678) 474-1688

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Grady Rape Crisis Center – Atlanta, GA

Hotline: (404) 616-4861

Phone: (404) 616-4861

DeKalb Rape Crisis Center – Decatur, GA

Hotline: (404) 377-1428

Phone: (404) 377-1428

YWCA of NW Georgia – Marietta, GA

Hotline: (770) 427-3390

Phone: (770) 427-3390

Gwinnett Sexual Assault Center – Duluth, GA

Hotline: (770) 476-7407

Phone: (770) 476-7407

Southern Crescent Sexual Assault Center – Jonesboro, GA

Hotline: (770) 477-2177

Phone: (770) 477-2177
West Georgia Rape Crisis Center – Carrollton , GA

Hotline: (770) 834-7273
Phone: (770) 834-7273

Rape Response, Inc. – Gainesville, GA

Hotline: (800) 721-1999

Hotline: (770) 503-7273

Phone: (770) 503-7273

The Sexual Assault Center of Northwest Georgia – Rome, GA

Hotline: (706) 802-0580

Hotline: (706) 802-0580
Phone: (706) 802-0580

The Cottage Sexual Assault Center – Athens, GA

Hotline: (877) 363-1912

Hotline: (706) 353-1912

Phone: (706) 353-1912

North Georgia Mountain Crisis Network – Blue Ridge, GA

Hotline: (800) 334-2836

Hotline: (706) 632-8400

Phone: (706) 632-8400

SAFE Inc. – Blairsville, GA

Hotline: (706) 379-3000

Phone: (706) 379-3000

Crisis line and Safe House of Central Georgia – Macon, GA

Hotline: (478) 745-9292

Phone: (478) 745-9292

2nd Chance – Anniston, AL

Hotline: 1-800-650-6522

Hotline: (256) 236-7233

Phone: (256) 236-7233

HODAC’s Victim Resource Center – Warner Robins, GA

Hotline: (800) 338-6745

Hotline: (478) 953-7234

Phone: (478) 953-7234

Reach of Cherokee – Murphy, NC

Hotline: (828) 837-8064
Phone: (828) 837-8064

Sexual Assault Victim’s Advocacy Center – Ft. Oglethrope, GA

Hotline: (800) 274-2211

Hotline: (706) 419-8775

Phone: (706) 419-8775

Sexual Assault Support Center – Columbus, GA

Hotline: (706) 571-6010

Phone: (706) 571-6010

Reach of Clay County – Hayesville, NC

Hotline: (828) 389-0797

Phone: (828) 389-0797

Family Resource Agency – Cleveland, TN

Hotline: (423) 476-3886

Phone: (423) 476-3886

F.A.I.T.H. in Rabun County, Inc. – Clayton, GA

Hotline: (888) 782-1338

Hotline: (706) 782-1338

Phone: (706) 782-1338

Crisis Center of Russell County – Phenix City, AL

Hotline: (334) 297-4401

Phone: (334) 297-4401

Rape Counselors of East Alabama – Opelika, AL

Hotline: (334) 705-0510

Phone: (334) 705-0510
Partnership for Families, Children, and Adult: Rape Crisis Center – Chattanooga, TN

Hotline: (423) 755-2700

Phone: (423) 755-2700

Reach of Macon also Serving Jackson County – Franklin, NC

Hotline: (828) 586-8969

Phone (828) 586-8969

Women in Need of God’s Shelter, Inc. – Dublin, GA

Hotline: (478) 272-8000

Phone: (478) 272-8000

SAFE, Inc. of Transylvania County – Brevard, NC

Hotline: (828) 885-7233

Phone: (828) 885-7233

 

REPORTING SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

 

REPORTING TO THE POLICE

It is recommended that the police are contacted as soon as possible. It is particularly important for the protection of both the student and the Law School community that the incident be reported to law enforcement. In emergency situations, please call 911. In addition, please contact the Law School security office. The security office can be reached by phone at (404) 380-4240 or (678) 916-2699 or by email at security@johnmarshall.edu. If the incident occurred in Fulton County, you can also contact the Atlanta Police Department at (404) 546-5605.

REPORTING TO THE LAW SCHOOL

The Law School provides several options for students who believe they have been subjected to sexual misconduct. Any law school student who has a concern, inquiry, or complaint regarding prohibited misconduct should feel free to seek information and advice concerning the Law School’s policies and guidelines, and formal and informal grievance procedures. Additionally, students have access to counseling and other services the Law School makes available to those who believe they have been subjected to prohibited misconduct or violence. If you have questions, please contact the Title IX Coordinator, Dean Sheryl Harrison-Mercer, at (678) 916-2681 or at (404) 808-7887. She can also be reached by email at sharrison-mercer@johnmarshall.edu.

The Title IX Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the Law School’s response to allegations of sexual misconduct that are made against students, and identifying and addressing any patterns of systemic problems revealed by such allegations. This would include ensuring that immediate and appropriate steps are taken to investigate or otherwise determine what occurred. When investigations reveal that reported sexual misconduct creates a hostile environment, the Title IX Coordinator is responsible for taking prompt and effective steps that are reasonably calculated to end the sexual misconduct, eliminate the hostile environment, prevent its recurrence and, as appropriate, remedy its effects.

REPORTING TO RESPONSIBLE EMPLOYEES
In instances of sexual misconduct, all law school employees (except those designated as Victim Advocates) are responsible employees. A “responsible employee” is a law school employee who has the authority to redress sexual violence, who has the duty to report incidents of sexual violence or other student misconduct, or who a student could reasonably believe has this authority or duty. A responsible employee will report to the Title IX Coordinator all relevant details about the alleged sexual violence shared by the complainant, if the allegation pertains to misconduct by another student. A responsible employee cannot guarantee that the Law School will be able to honor a request for confidentiality. However, to the extent possible, information reported to a responsible employee will be shared only with people responsible for handling the Law School’s response to the report. In reporting the details of the incident to the Title IX Coordinator, the responsible employee will inform the Coordinator of the complainant’s request for confidentiality, if such a request has been made.

The Law School encourages victims of sexual violence to talk to somebody about what happened so victims can get the support they need and so the Law School can respond appropriately. Different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain a complainant’s confidentiality. A complainant has various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to them. Those options are as follows:

Privileged and Confidential Communications. Professional, licensed counselors who provide mental-health counseling to members of the Law School community are not required to report any information about an incident to the Title IX Coordinator without a complainant’s permission. The Law School offers professional counselors on and off campus, free of charge. The contact information for those counselors is listed below.

Counseling Services on Campus Counseling Services off Campus
Sunamita Tuple, LPC

(678) 929-4679

 (404) 610-2007 (cell)

Joel Baker, LMFT

(678) 948-8057

Joel@joelBakerCounseling.com

 

A complainant who speaks to a professional counselor must understand that if the complainant wants to maintain confidentiality this could severely limit the Law School’s ability to conduct an investigation into the particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against the respondent. Even if the victim is interested in maintaining confidentiality, the counselor will still assist the complainant in receiving other necessary protection and support, such as victim advocacy, academic support or accommodations, disability, health or mental health services, and changes to living, working or course schedules. A complainant who at first requests confidentiality may later decide to file a complaint with the school or report the incident to local law enforcement and have the incident fully investigated.

While the professional counselor may maintain a complainant’s confidentiality vis-à-vis the Law School, the professional counselor may have reporting or other obligations under state law.

If the Law School determines that the respondent poses a serious and immediate threat to the Law School community, the Law School may be required to issue a timely warning to the community. Any such warning will not include any information that identifies the complainant.

Off-campus Counselors and Advocates. Other off-campus counselors, advocates, and health care providers will also generally maintain confidentiality and not share information with the Law School unless the complainant requests the disclosure and signs a consent or waiver form. A list of off-campus counselors and advocates is included below.

 

INDIVIDUAL & FAMILY COUNSELING

Atlanta Area Psychological Associates

(770) 730-9930

Catholic Charities (Spanish speaking counselors)

(404) 885-7425

Center for Pan Asian Community Services (Korean, Vietnamese, Chinese, Japanese, Laotian, Thai, Filipino)

(770) 936-0969

DeKalb Rape Crisis Center

(404) 377-1428

Families First (Offices in Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fulton, Gwinnett, and Rockdale counties)

(404) 853-2800

Fulton County Behavioral Health Access and Information Line

(404)730-1688

Georgia Crisis and Access Line

1(866) 821-0465

Fulton County Solicitor’s Office Victim Assistance Program

(404) 612-6883

Georgia Center for Children (child sexual abuse counseling)

(678) 904-2880

Grady Rape Crisis Center

(404) 616-4861

Grady Psychiatric Emergency Room

(404) 616-4762

Heartwork Counseling Center

(404) 658-1222
Link Counseling Center
(404) 256-9797

Karuna Counseling for Women

(404) 321-4307

Metropolitan Counseling Services

(404) 321-1794

North Atlanta Counseling Services

(770) 998-0989

Northside Behavioral Health Center

(404) 851-8960

Odyssey Family Counseling (Hapeville, College Park, McDonough)

(404) 768-1156

Refugee Family Services

(404) 299-2243

Shalom Bayit/ Jewish Family & Career Services

(770) 677-9322


Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School strives to create a safe environment for students, faculty, and staff. If you have concerns about your experience, or another student’s experience, with sexual misconduct, you can speak confidentially to a counselor or the Title IX Coordinator. Even if you have not been the victim of sexual misconduct, it is your responsibility as a student, a bystander and a member of the community to report and discourage this behavior.

Students who have experienced an act of sexual misconduct will often disclose their experience to a friend or loved one first. This can be overwhelming for the person in the supportive role who may not know what to do or say to be helpful. It is important for victims to have people in their lives who will be empathetic, supportive and knowledgeable about available resources. If you have questions about the resources that are available, please contact the Title IX Coordinator at sharrison-mercer@johnmarshall.edu.

If a victim of sexual assault contacts you, it is important to allow the victim or survivor to make choices pertaining to his/her next steps. In allowing the victim to make decisions, big or small, you are helping him or her to regain a sense of control. A supportive person can be instrumental in providing resources, encouragement and information to help a student make informed choices related to trauma.

Remember that a victim may ultimately choose not to take legal action or seek counseling. He or she may just want to forget what happened, which is a completely normal reaction. It is important not to attempt to shame the victim into taking action or become judgmental if the victim does not make a decision that you feel is right. Provide the resources and information, ensure that he or she is safe, and support their right to choose. While this may be difficult for you to understand, know that what the victim is experiencing is overwhelming and we must respect his or her right to do what is comfortable to them at that time.

 

Title IX Coordinator

Dean Sheryl Harrison-Mercer

(404) 872-3593 ext. 2681

Sharrison-mercer@johnmarshall.edu

 

 

Fulton County Police
(404) 613-5700

 

 

Campus Security

(404) 380-4240 cell

(404) 872-3593 ext. 2699

security@johnmarshall.edu.

 

 

Atlanta Police
(404) 614-6544

 

 

If you have been accused of sexual misconduct, you have rights too. Resources are available to you, as well. These rights include the right to be advised of proper channels for support, the right to have a support person, the right to a fair and impartial process, the right to review all relevant information that will be considered in the hearing process, and the right to be treated with dignity and respect throughout the process. All parties to a sexual misconduct complaint are entitled to a support person of their choosing. The support person may provide support before, during and after the formal conduct process. The support person may not “represent” any of the parties during the investigation or formal conduct process.

The conduct process affords a wide latitude of responses, ranging from an administrative warning to dismissal. However, in many instances, it becomes necessary to remove an individual from the community when he or she is found responsible for sexual misconduct to safeguard the complainant and other members of the Law School community from further harm.

To maintain privacy, only those responsible for responding to the complaint and participating in the investigation will be notified. The personal counseling center may provide confidential support with the limited exception of instances involving a direct threat to the campus community. In limited instances it may be the duty of the institution to make a public announcement without using identifying information.

The accused student will be notified by the Title IX Coordinator or Investigator that an investigation has been initiated. The accused student will receive notification if and when a formal conduct conference is scheduled or the complaint is closed. The accused student and the complainant will receive notification of the outcome of any formal conduct conference or hearing. For additional information about the hearing process, please refer to the Sexual Misconduct Policy.

At the conclusion of an investigation, the Law School will determine if a formal conduct process is appropriate given the information that is available at that time. If a formal conduct process is initiated, the accused student will receive notification of a conduct conference and the reason for that conference. The accused student will have an opportunity to discuss the facts of the incident and present any direct witnesses that may work toward substantiation of facts relating directly to the incident. The accused student will receive notification of a decision following the conference and investigation in a timely manner. The accused student will also be given the opportunity to file a written appeal. For further information about hearing procedures, please see the Law School’s Policy on Sexual Misconduct.

The Title IX Coordinator serves as the primary point of contact for facilitating the issuance of interim measures to stabilize the situation, stop the misconduct, support the people involved in the report and the community, and protect the integrity of the investigation. These measures may be put in place by the Title IX Coordinator whether the report is resolved informally or formally, or whether or not a full investigation is conducted. Examples of interim measures include but are not limited to:

Safety Measures:  The Title IX Coordinator may coordinate any reasonable arrangements that are necessary for ongoing safety.

Campus Restriction:  A campus restriction may be imposed to restrict an individual from certain areas of campus.

Academic Arrangements/Modifications: The Title IX Coordinator may assist with adjusting academic schedules, withdrawals, absence notifications, deadline extensions, and testing accommodations as well with providing resources to academic support services.

Other Interim Measures:  The Title IX Coordinator may coordinate reasonable arrangements to address the effects of Title IX complaints, including connections with counseling or academic support resources.

Please note that this list of interim measures is not exhaustive.

  • On average, nearly 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States. During one year, this equates to more than 10 million women and men.1
  • 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have been victims of [some form of] physical violence by an intimate partner within their lifetime.
  • 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men have been victims of severe physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime.
  • 1 in 7 women and 1 in 18 men have been stalked by an intimate partner during their lifetime and have felt very fearful or believed that they or someone close to them would be harmed or killed.
  • On a typical day, there are more than 20,000 phone calls placed to domestic violence hotlines nationwide.
  • The presence of a gun in a domestic violence situation increases the risk of homicide by 500%.
  • Intimate partner violence accounts for 15% of all violent crime.
  • Women between the ages of 18-24 are most commonly abused by an intimate partner.
  • 19% of domestic violence involves a weapon.
  • Domestic victimization is correlated with a higher rate of depression and suicidal behavior.
  • Only 34% of people who are injured by intimate partners receive medical care for their injuries.

*Available at: http://ncadv.org/learn-more/statistics

Additional Resources:

http://www.loveisrespect.org/

https://www.rainn.org/

http://www.thehotline.org/2014/07/men-can-be-victims-of-abuse-too/

https://www.circleof6app.com/

  • Victim/Survivor Information

  • Offender Information

  • Relationship to Victim

  • Incident Information

  • Please provide specific location where incident occurred, including name of location and/or address, if known:
  • Type of Incident

Victim Advocate Training

Contact Information:

Dean Sheryl Harrison-Mercer
(678) 916-2681
sharrison-mercer@johnmarshall.edu